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for future bailouts. but making large depositors pay will hurt the wider economy, too. and that's the big question. yes, cyprus has been saved from bankruptcy and will remain in the euro zone, but at what price? some are estimating that with the reduction in the banking sector and with higher taxes, the cypriot economy could shrink by 10%. with years of hardship. and that is the big unknown. will the rescue end uncertainty or will cyprus end up like some of the other bailed out countries, with a lost generation, facing recession and job losses? >> pretty grim prospects in cyprus. and in a speech to the cypriot people tonight, the president called the deal painful but he said it was the best he could get. for more on the reaction there, i spoke to the bb's tim wilcox. we have now some clarity on the deal that cyprus has struck with europe. does it look like the island's actually going to be worse off because of this? >> it's instinct because i've just been talking to one of the m.p.'s who voted against the proposals last week, which was going to have a 10% levy or hair cut on deposits over
of the gridlock and dysfunction here in washington, d.c. they can see that our economy is slowly getting back on its feet, businesses are beginning to hire more workers, but my constituents and people across the country are very frustrated that the constant political crises are holding our recovery back right when we need to be doing everything possible to support it. after two years of debate about fiscal and economic policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisa
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
say that cyprus' economy is going to be in significant peril in the future. >> warner: and i gather a lot of these big depositors are russians, other foreigners? how much is known about them? >> a lot of the deposits particularly at the major banks are certainly from russians. cyprus has, you know, a long history with russia. in recent years, we had a lot of russians coming to this island basically sort of seeking a safe haven for their money, given some of the instability in russia. what has happened, however, is that that has drawn suspicion over time that, for example, some oligarchs or even some money of questionable origin is in the banking system. that's one reason why european leaders and particularly chancellor angela merkel wanted to take a much closer look at cyprus' banking sector as a part of this whole bailout. >> warner: how fundamentally will the cyprus economy be restructured or changed? >> the cyprus economy basically lives and breathes on finance. ever since it joined the european union it has shifted away from an economy that had produced a lot of goods over many
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
country at the forefront of the global economy. israelis understand the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. that spirit has led to economic growth and progress. ,olar power, electric cars synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
tax will be cut to 20%, the lowest tax rate than any other economy in the world. in his one-hour speech, chancellor osborne announced measures aimed at assisting small business owners, first- time homebuyers, and british veterans. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. mr. deputy speaker, this is a budget for people who aspire to work hard and get on. it's a budget for people who realise there are no easy answers to problems built up over many years. just the painstaking work of putting right what went so badly wrong. and together with the british people we are, slowly but surely, fixing our country's economic problems. we've now cut the deficit not by a quarter, but by a third. we've helped business create not a million new jobs, but one and a quarter million new jobs. we've kept interest rates at record lows. but mr. deputy speaker, despite the progress we've made, there's much more to do. today, i'm going to level with people about the difficult economic circumstances we still face and the hard decisions required to deal with them. it is taking longer than anyone
. no doubt about that. it could hurt the economy by ten gdp points. joblessness but the banks were going collapse anyway. the economy would be in shambles anyway. there is concern that the depositors are hurt, because what is happening is if you have more than 100,000 in euros in the bank, those are targeted to help with the bail-out. $4.2 billion. a lot of that is from russian. a lot of -- he would cry about that. this is a good thing. bail-in, instead of bail-out. you take in a model where you are forcing the bank to save itself. the shareholders, bondholders and go to the uninsured depositors. this is a lesson we might take here. rather than the taxpayers bail-out you have the bail-out within the institution. i understand the pain but i don't think it's a bad idea. >> you float the idea of going after the saving account. it doesn't rez nay with many folks. >> but they weren't insured. they weren't insured over $100,000. here they aren't over $100,000. you know, you know when you put something in a bank like, that i covered the savings and the loan crisis in '80s. people were hurt in t
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
agenda. he got health care passed and fixed the economy. he has the economy on the right track. the gun issue was not a big deal with him in the beginning. gale marriage was not a big issue, but they have become centerpieces, that's the period he's in at this point. republicans are cooperating to the degree that they appeared to be disorganized enough that he appears to be right on track. >> you know, on that point, in terms of the economy, victoria, the president talking about the budget last week, he said something that the gop just jumped all over. the president said, and i'm quoting him, we don't have an immediate crisis in terms of debt, and the republicans and the right wing went bananas. but then mr. boehner and ryan, of course, agree with him. watch this. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis, but we all know that we have one looming. >> we do not have a debt crisis right now, but we see it coming. we know it's irrefeetably happeningivities they say the president shouldn't have said it, now you have boehner and ryan saying it, about you if both say we don't have an immediat
revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion
and the republicans in congress balanced the budget, but that's because the economy was growing in 1990s. i was there, i know it. it was balance -way before anybody expected it to be balanced. there is nothing that is particularly important about balancing the budget. it sounds good, but you don't really want the budget to be balanced if you have a lot of people who are unemployed or under utilize examines city. there's no reason to balance the budgets on the backs of the poor and if it means sacrificing investments in education job training, research and development, infrastructure. those are investments in future growth, the future of our country. we don't want to reduce those investments for the sake of some totem which is called balanced budgets. >> you pointed out to the gop leadership is held hostage by the tea party. when john boehner said we don't have a long term debt problem in this country it seemed he and president obama agreed to tone down the rhetoric to calm people a a bit. were you encouraged by that statement? >> i am encouraged in the sense that there is not a long term debt problem
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
stuart: the highlight reel. all about cyprus. cyprus, they'll out approved. >> the economy is likely to get worse. >> continuation of stealing what has already been stolen. they will not be happy. >> they are devastated. that is not what cyprus is or ever was. >> europe does not have the mechanisms in place that the united states has to manage a currency or a banking system. >> watch the euro. that affects all of us. stuart: italian banks have been halted in trading. charles: yes. stuart: why? charles: they are worried. these stocks are plummeting. stuart: the dutch finance minister said the cyprus situation is a good template for other european countries. they have reached into private bank accounts, taken the money out and used it to finance the bailout. that is what everybody wanted to avoid and now the dow is down 43 points. >> that italian banks are frozen because now the fear is they will have their money taken out. stuart: the dutch minister is now staying this could prompt a euro zone bank restructuring. that is why the dow is now down 46 points. you have a 80-point
at the hp pavilion ahead of tomorrow's slate of games. >> the fans equal a win for san jose's economy. monte francis live in san jose where you spoke to downtown businesses with more on the economic impact. good morning, monte. >> marla, good morning. in 2010, this tournament generated about $20 million for san jose's economy. expectations this time around are just as high. as you said, college basketball fans from across the country flying into san jose for the tournament. hotels, bars, restaurants in downtown san jose are hoping to recover some of the money they lost with nhl lockout this past season. we're told right now many hotels in san jose are fully booked. when it comes to ncaa's impact on the local economy, there is a trickle down effect. the ceo of the san jose silicon valley chamber of commerce says when the hotels are booked, that translates to more revenue for restaurants, bars, and cafes. >> the expectations are always high. obviously the economic impact can vary. i think the numbers we heard from 2010 were about $20 million in economic impact. so whenever you can bring people
are not seeing it. >> u.s. has stopped becoming a manufacturing and has become a service economy. >> neil: go ahead, adam. >> charlie was making an interesting pointed. you said earlier why don't unions give in the way the private sector employees have given in in the fact of the matter is a lot of people watch that understand that the benefits aren't very good sometimes. >> private sector gets screwed on everything. >> here is the thing. let me finish. thousand jobs or a thousand workers, those private sector guys getting screwed are a getting hundred guys getting lavish benefits. >> sounds like the grapes of wrath. >> neil: are we forgetting that we as taxpayers fund at least in the case of the public, union members their benefits, their incredibly generous benefits compared to ours? we are paying for them. we fork over the money and pay the bills. i think that is the issue that is lost. hey, taxpayers you are here as a service to me. you help me and i'm paying through the nose for you. >>> when the teachers strike in chicago it makes people angry. they know that, frankly we the american pe
might go a little higher. that has an inflationary effect on the economy. so you may be talking away the money you just gave that employee through the increase. raise prices throughout the economy. >> i have to say, you've now switched your argument from what it was going to do to your business to what it's going to do to the economy. >> very sharp, senator warren. whether a minimum wage increase and why. we've heard all this madness on the other side, especially small business people. we won't be able to pay insurance and the like. is that a real reasonable and persuasive argument? >> no and in fact, we have a real world experiment that tells us about this. in new jersey a few years ago, they raised the minimum wage. they did it in pennsylvania. there was an examination of fast food and it turned out that in new jersey, hiring went up and in pennsylvania, hiring went down. but let me turn this upside down. why aren't we talking about the fact that the total stock market is worth less today than in 2000 and yet, the ceos are getting more and more money. if we just turned this argumen
stand? and israel's minister of the economy is here to answer our questions. >>> plus, mayor michael bloomberg called starbucks ceo ridiculi ridiculist. >>> and the head of colorado's department of corrections answers the door only to be shot down. we take you to the manhunt tonight. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight with friends like these, well, president obama arrived in israel to day. it was his first trip there as president. everything seemed rosey for a little while between him and benjamin netanyahu. >> and just as we have for these past 65 years, the united states is proudo stand with you as your strongest ally and your greatest friend. >> i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and alliance between our two countries. >> sounded so perfect. but then -- later in the day things changed. >> iran is a grave threat to israel, a grave threat to the world, a nuclear iran. the united states is committed to dealing with it. >> each country has to make its own decisi
over republicans handling the economy to just a four-point advantage. congress is down there with saddam hussein and gaddafi and popularity, except that the other guys, being dead, don't really care. congress does. the president has to do the charm offensive because he got cocky. he won the election and he crushed republicans on the fiscal cliff, and he tried to do it on sequester. sequester, the way he pushed it, was a mistake. he overshot with talk of the apocalypse, which exposed and to ridicule. but then he acted so cynically with the biggest example being the shutting down of the white house tours, and people can understand that the administration was deliberately trying to find stuff that would be painful and visible rather than being economical with cuts. that is white and he had to retreat -- why he had to retreat. purposes.s serves two it makes the eu and look efficient by contrast, and makes the president's job rating look good by comparison. a continuing resolution, a washington speech, -- to fund, government's there will be an agreement on that pit the crunc
. let's listen. >> due to the influx and further strained the economy that is already under considerable external pressures with an unstable region, the ghoebl economy recovering. but having said that as i already alluded to, we are so grateful to the u.s. assistance in solving this enormous responsibility and together continue to appeal to international community for more help to face this calamity. i had the opportunity, obviously, to talk about the peace process and we're very delighted by the vision and depth of wisdom the president showed over the past several days with israelis and palestinians. and obviously reiterate jordan's commitment to the peace process and the crucial importance of the u.s. leadership in resuming the palestinian-israeli negotiations based on the two-state solution. there is simply no other formula, no other -- two-state solution is the only way to go and if you compare that also with the radicalization of syria, together with the peace process, this is going to be a serious threat to an already volatile region. i believe there is a window of opportunity to m
and the eurozone andng period of uncertainty insecurity surrounding the cyprus economy has in then. avertede we have iterally the possibility of bankruptcy and assure the prospects for generations to come. >> was it really aconite for cyprus? pension and insurance funds face major losses in the big banks. that will hurt ordinary people. lines of credit to small businesses could freeze. austerity will begin to eat into jobs, growth, and salaries. without a deal, cyprus faced immediate ruling. which is, the pain will still come, just perhaps more slowly. will nowd nation receive a $13 billion package of rescue loans, not enough, some predict, to avoid trouble down the road. in europe isry going to decide the pain of being inside the bureau is not risk losingn you 40% of deposits. >> without an agreement, cyprus would have become the first country to leave the euro. that has been averted. aanswered questions include or cost, to whom, and for how long? economice to an historian at the university of cyprus. he said the deal marks the beginning of a long and painful process of reform. >> disaster has
and the people are angry. the economy is on the edge. how is this a win? >> it is a win in a technical stents -- a sense. they would not fund -- because of that overnight agreement, that bankruptcy has been averted. on the ground, in reality, there are people there who are desperate to get money out. there are concerns in brussels about future bailouts. it is only a win in that very narrow definition of not having suffered the first bankruptcy of a national bank in the european union. but beyond that, we wait and see. >> as you indicated, this is not just cyprus. it is much broader. they are concerned to save -- to say the least. what guarantees do they have at their money is safe in the eurozone? >> if you are a small savor in the bank, bureaucrats here will tell you that cyprus was one off. yes, we came close to breaking bank accounts, but it did not quite happen, so rest calm. people responding to that is that so far, every time there has been a a lot or crisis, it has been a one off. greece was a one off and it could not happen again in that form. spain, portugal, italy. what's a cyprus h
and the economy, support for proxies'. if you had the opportunity to sit quietly with the supreme leader of iran and talk to him, talk him out of whatever he appears to be intending to do, what would you say to him about u.s. intentions at u.s. cooperation with our partners in the region? >> i would send dennis rodman over there. [laughter] the truth is the first thing i would do i would ask why they are doing what they're doing and i would like to hear it from him personally. because we know of course what his surrogates and proxy's are doing. i would like to know from him they close by the way, you know in that region that the three countries that have always been country, iran, turkey, egypt, they are the cornerstone of that region. it does not mean that we want to be like them or anyone want to be like them, but we have to account for the fact that those three countries are the historic cornerstones or and points of that region. the first thing i would like to is what is a they believe the future holds for the region and why are they apparently, it seems to me, on a path to try to dredge up
economy and creates good jobs that american people need to support their families. we must balance our budget for our students. those who are currently in our universities and community colleges should feel confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, m
. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong, the markets are roaring, we've had a few days where it has slowed just a bit. but the average american, the pedestrian middle class family how well are they doing? how confident are they? and if the economy slows for them, the prospects for immigration reform, i don't believe are nearly as high, if you don't get what mark has been saying now for over two weeks. the sequencing done right on this cut spending cuts and tax reform. things sound great and they're moving along now. but joe, as we talked about earlier, you're going to have reticent democrats. and even key congressional races who are going to slow down a bit and saying, look, i want immigration and guns dealt with, what are we doing about the economy and the budget, the debt, and tax reform? >> and this is, richard haas, you can only push people so far, i mean, not the republicans' best friend. this weekend said democrats you're about to lose me. i pay 40% federal, 15%. well, i hear we have it cued up. let's go. this is bill maher this weekend. >> -- actually do pay the freight in th
of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. but not just by shifting the burden to seniors and disabled as the republicans propose in their fantasy budget. my home state of oregon is the middle of an exciting demonstration of how to squeeze out the waste we all know is there and realign incentives. instead of the empty ritual of pretending to repeal obamacare, let's work together to accelerate reform for all americans. if the oregon experiment works, and frankly many of these efeshencies by the way are already achieved in other parts of the country and with some private health systems, we could save more than $1.2 trillion that is the flawed sequester is suppos
a two day meeting on the economy this afternoon. then fed chairman ben bernanke will hold a news conference. we will have live coverage of his remarks to reporters at 2:30 eastern on c-span3. here's some of what we're covering this morning. the house is expected to finish work on the republican budget of the 2014 budget. live coverage of 10:00 eastern on c-span. on c-span2, the senate is working on a measure to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcom
. a new trend is emerging among investors worldwide expecting a global scale economy they are moving to lower risk bond so they can buy into higher return stocks. the sale strategy for japanese bond hasn't paid off so far but he's confident that the prices will permit in the near future. >> we will continue to do that for the next five to seven years. we'll maintain this position every year for the next foreseeable future. you'll have to be positioned because when they move they will move very quickly. >> reporter: when japanese bond prices remain stable or will they crash as fast as managers expect. all eyes are now on abe's new economic strategy. >> the nikkei is opening lower this friday. i'll leave you with a check on other markets. >>> the car bomb exploded at the refugee camp in an area bordering afghanistan. it's a known stronghold for islamist insurgent groups. l local police said 12 people were killed and 20 wounded. >> translator: i was near the food distribution point when there was a big explosion. i don't know what happened. >> camp residents have been affected by violen
taxpayers. in 1990's president clinton worked with a republican congress to grow the economy and to restrain spending. in the 1990's, the balanced budget agreement actually resulted in a much faster balanced budget than anybody anticipated. balancing the budget was a major accomplishment for republicans in the 1990's, and also part of president clinton's legacy. i would hope that president obama would learn from that. the american people overwhelmingly support balancing our budgets. and the budget the senate democrats are considering never balances, ever. that means more debt, fewer jobs, and, frankly, much higher taxes from the american people. we certainly hope the president will change his mind and submit a plan that actually balances the budget. let's be clear, the democrats in this town who reject the goal of balancing the budget i think were out of step of where the american people are. the american people know you can't continue to spend money you don't have. i didn't come here for a fancy title or big office. i want to hand my kids and grandkids the same shot at the american dream th
see the economy take off mr. mr. norquist? >> guest: okay, we haven't had trillion dollars spending cuts that we had an agreement by the president of the united states forced on them by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars, so 100 million a year. they haven't started yet and they're just beginning to kick in. this a quest or is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decades to what the republicans want in the state battle we had in 2011, the budget control act was obama needs the debt ceiling to be increased because we spent so much money and republican said okay, we will raise the debt ceiling so the country doesn't default but only if you agree to a dollar for dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. that $2.5 trillion in spending restraints, not real cuts, spending, less than obama had hoped but in washington that is called a cut. if you want 10 of something and you only got eight of something, you walked away with eight but so that was the $2.5 trillion spending reduction over the next decade. it hasn't happened yet. we have sever
people, but the economy, that was a glimpse of the kinds of effects that you could create with a cyberattack. that is why it has our attention. >> that is why individual industries, and given the potential, had preemptive action today. >> senator, i think that this set some standards and goals. we have identified the correct relationships between commercial and private and government. .. i presume that you are seeing huge pressures as naval forces are withdrawn because of budget pressures, but also can you comment on the role of coast guard because even though it's not the jurisdiction i present a place of very large role, too. if the idb to push its in your al because that will degrade. >> i think i plan to grow on their life in that part of the world. we are ensuring that they hip and shoulder to shoulder. as you say with a secret regime, i occupy a seat that is before suitable combatant commanders. we didn't get much that we get just about zero now if sequestration stands. what that translates to his last year we get 150 to 200 tons of cocaine on the high seas, coast gu
expect, eating and drinking the fans are doing a lot to stimulate the downtown economy. here is david louie. >> downtown san jose has bean teaming all day with game goers. one of the sports bars was packed at 10:30 in the morning. >> it's nonstop. all day long. all hands on deck. >> the fans were thirsty. beer was flowing continuously. the tabs kept mounting. san jose downtown association is says fans will pump one million dollars maybe more into the local economy. ken from boston ran down the numbers. he has tickets to all four games today. >> thousand dollars to fly down here, $500 for the tickets, two nights in a hotel, another $500, going out, $4,000. >> two brothers saw a golden gate golden opportunity to sell balloons. >> this will a weekend. >> couple hundred dollars? >> maybe around there. >> the scalpers are making a few bucks bu they avoided our camera. the games do no other thing can do, steady flow of people needing to drink and eat at certain times. business owners are ecstatic. number of pizzas they are selling. >> we are prepared to do those. so far we made up thousand
on the global economy. particularly in asia. every adjourning area next to iran is susceptible to a local war which used to be called people's war. passivelyus to be friendly, expecting soviet reactions. likelyasked what is the soviet reaction by the president of the united states? they may state border incidents, we have had lots of them. then he says they may invade us from mongolia where they have 22 armored divisions and strike southward towards beijing directly. he says we will use people's war, and i know what he meant. the kind of things we experienced also. people's wars do not end quickly. we are not going to kill all iranians. inn if they do these things the region. the protracted conflict will make this experience a bit -- make this experience of a decade ago seemed like a trifle. therefore i am worried by we are trying to buy off this pressure the president is feeling for commitments to military action against iran without fully contemplating the large scale geopolitical consequences, the affect a effectthe this -- the that we will be alone in this adventure have no illusions. eve
will we see the economy take off, mr. norquist? >> guest: okay. we haven't had a trillion dollar in spending cuts what we had was an agreement by the president of the united states forced on him by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars. so that's $100 billion a year. and those cuts haven't started happening yet. they're just beginning to kick in. the sequester is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decade. so what the republicans won in that big battle we had in 2011, the budget control act, was that obama wanted to keep spending, and he needed the debt ceiling to be increased because he'd spent so much money. and the republicans said, okay, we'll raise the debt ceiling is so the country doesn't default, but only if you agree to a dollar-for-dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. and so we got $2.5 trillion in spending restraint. not real cuts, spending less than obama had hoped in. in washington that's called a cut. if you wanted ten of something and you only got eight of something, you go i got cut too. actually, you walked a
the deficit and grow our economy. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. thompson of california for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the request s granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from california, mr. bera, is recognized as 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. bera: mr. speaker, thank you for that recognition. thank you for this time. mr. speaker, over the past several weeks, i've been talking to my constituents, i've been talking to former patients about the importance medicare and how medicare has impacted their lives, how they've relied on it. you know, as a doctor, i've taken care of thousands of patients, patients who've worked their whole life paying into a system so that they could rest easy at a time when they needed their health care. hey -- they needed their health care they wouldn't have to worry about it. this is a program that has served millions of americans for decades. they've come
: without knowing the structure of the new bedford economy, it is experiencing what a lot of people are experiencing. depending on the industries, you are a winner or loser depending on the structure of your economy. places that are strong in are growing.ces information sector, utilities. these are areas that have not been growing. host: talk about new england. aest: i grew up outside of town in massachusetts. it has similarities to new bedford. .bout 100,000 people strong industrial heritage. it redefined and re-scope itself successfully over the last couple of decades. massachusetts recognizes that its older cities have these challenges. and i go home to visit, there have been efforts to revitalize the older cities. they have lots of charms. new bedford has a wonderful whaling history. has worked atry sincetizens -- census 1997. we are looking at population changes. our other guest is lisa sturtevant with guest: richey-- where mason university she is a p deputy analysis. let's hear from bob, south dakota, rural. caller: i have some comments. [indiscernible] we should look at our
america's case on a daily basis because he would be's with the economy. so one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state because she knew she could do that for him on a daily basis around the world. that's why i think that she would bring to him accurate reading of where things stood. what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward in terms of agreement, where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him the -- what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles but she certainly influenced a lot of decision. libya being one of them, and asia definitely. >> host: we'll get to libya next. a very interesting scenario and what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli-palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 and she spoke there and she said farflung destinations from the chronic where she would be traveling, that issue would come up as the first, second, or third issue, and it struck me as unlikely, other than europe, that people would be focusing on this far-flung destination, and once we saw wikilea
, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. [ female announcer ] stress sweat is different than ordinary sweat. it smells worse. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. mr. wiggles and curling irons. for the little mishaps you feel, use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster neosporin. also try neosporin eczema essentials. >>> tonight president obama is traveling to israel in his first foreign policy trip since winning re-election. tomorrow he'll met with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. topping the agenda, iran's nuclear ambitions. on thursday the president will tour the west bank and meet with mahmoud abbas, president of the palestinian authority. then friday it's on to jordan f
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a decade after the iraq war began, the violence has not abated. today was the bloodiest day this year, as insurgents staged multiple attacks. a high-level minister was assassinated and dozens more died. a warning: our story contains some graphic images. thick, black smoke rose above the sadr city district in baghdad, where a car bomb went off today, in one of several coordinated attacks to rock the iraqi capital. 65 people were killed and more than 100 wounded. in another instance, an explosion ripped through a popular market near baghdad's fortified green zone. >> there is a checkpoint at the main gate, but it is in vain. they do not s
as well. we will keep following that one. talk with us about voters. >> they are nervous about the economy and the debt unlike leaders in washington. they think it needs to be dealt with right now. that's kierd to go a fox news poll released. two-thirds are nervous about the economy. more than twice the number that are confident. they are at odds about the budget deficit. they believe the federal government should be required to balance the budget. and when asked to describe the national debt 68 percent said it is an immediate problem. 27 percent said it's something that can be handled in the future. only 4 percent said it's not a problem. >> reveal your weight or pay a penalty. cvs announcing all workers on company healthcare must have an annual wellness review and report their weight, body fat, blood pressure and more. if they don't they will be charged $600 more a year. people not only criticizing the penalty but also wondering this about worker's privacy. in a statement cvs said personal health information would remain private. so we want to know would you reveal this information? send
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